[An anonymous "NSA analyst" produced the following demonstration that the DES code on the floppy can be used to encrypt and decrypt information. Instead of formatting the ciphertext in hex, the analyst apparently just displayed the raw binary. This produced gibberish containing numerous extended characters not in the standard ASCII character set. I have not attempted to exactly duplicate the appearance of that section in HTML.

The string "bluegrass% " does actually appear in the middle of the ciphertext. This strongly suggests that the program was run on a UNIX machine named "bluegrass" by a user with the csh shell. --Phil]


Here is the original plaintext file called 'sample3':
We are planning an all-out attack against the enemy in the vicinity of
Aitape about 10 July.
The following command encrypts the file called 'sample3' and places the encrypted contents in a file called 'sample3.enc':
enc2 sample3 sample3.enc abc48728bcd39012bc2778bdef287137
Here is the encrypted file:
c       @{li.tDprZBu$~)WBAQoUB~,~
~)3HKLo$bluegrass% t~N~]lZ-~Yp~#w¢fSy~+:ly
The following command decrypts the file 'sample3.enc' and places the contents (which are now the original text) in a file called 'sample3.original.text':
dec2 sample3.enc sample3.original text abc48728bcd39012bc2778bdef287137
Finally, here is the file 'sample3.original.text.' Notice that it is the same as the original plaintext.
We are planning an all-out attack against the enemy in the vicinity of
Aitape about 10 July.